The non conformer's Canadian Weblog

January 23, 2009

THE CRTC flubs it again

Registered with the do-not-call list? Expect more calls, says consumer watchdog

 Friday, January 23, 2009 |   CBC News  Canada’s highly touted do-not-call list is having the opposite effect, leading to more telemarketer calls, says the Consumers’ Association of Canada. “It’s a travesty,” president Bruce Cran said Friday. “Here we have all these people thinking they were getting rid of incoming phone calls. Anyone who is registered should suspect their phone number is being broadcast to the four winds.” The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission launched the registry in September to great fanfare, promising that those who registered would see a drop in unwanted calls soliciting goods and service. Millions of Canadians have registered their names, home phone numbers and in some cases their cellphone numbers. The problem, said Cran, is that the CRTC sells the registry list online. “In Toronto, you can get 600,000 names for $50,” he said. Telemarketers are required to subscribe to the list, paying an annual fee that depends on how often they chose to download updates. Those who violate the list by calling registrants may be fined up to $15,000 per call.  Chilliwack, B.C., real estate consultant Jim Stocco said he suspects the “avalanche of calls” he and his wife have been fielding lately is a result of having registered with the do-not-call list.  Before registering, Stocco had managed to bring unwanted phone solicitations down to about one a week by calling back telemarketers and asking them to take his phone number off their list.  “This do-not-call registry has made things worse. We now get five or six calls a day,” he said. “We both work at home and have clients across North America so we will answer calls. It has been a major irritant.”  Stocco said when he tries to call telemarketers back to ask that his number be taken off their list, he gets a voice mailbox that does not accept messages.  Glenn Thibeault, NDP critic for consumer protection, wrote to the federal privacy commissioner Jennifer Stoddart on Jan. 16 urging her to investigate.  “When the service is not only ineffective but assists in worsening the problem, Canadians have a right to be concerned, ” he said.   A spokesperson for the commissioner said Friday that she was aware of the problem before being contacted by Thibeault. “We are concerned as well,” said Heather Ormerod. “We are in contact with the CRTC and trying to gather relevant information to see how to proceed.”

 

I already rightfully have a very low opinion of the too often Useless CRTC

   

 

December 18, 2008

“Unfair” players

                tal  
We still do need real accountability, and the real beefing up of the enforcements, regulations against the much too many con artists liars, thieves, crooks, imposters, pretenders. being basically motivated by greed, increasing the profits. Bait and switch,  Misleading advertising, Unfair and Restrictive business trade practices seem to be a common thing in the Internet Service Providers  industry too, especially since generally the ISP are unregulated both by the Courts and the governments. It is a sad reality that even what is advertised is also next what the customer next consistently gets. ”  The first biggest unacceptable bad culprits still who need to be fired ASAP are those rather toothless, pretentious, federal and provincial consumer Ministers and their mostly bad subordinates. Healthy Competition was supposedly a good way to decrease  the prices and increase the services, but instead we get price fixings, unfair and restrictive trade practices.. which still all reminds me of the bad immoral Conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper trying to murder all of the opposition  out of existence too.. for he himself is no better as a leader, example of ethics, morality too. We do need still  a new real,  tougher cop on the beat. to strengthen all business, financial regulatory agencies and crack down on runaway “greed and scheming” , to really clean up the worlds of politics , finance, business and really  help to put in help put in place new, common-sense rules of the road that will protect investors, consumers and our entire economy from fraud and manipulation by an irresponsible few caused also by a  lack of “adult supervision” and  managers not being    as aggressive as they should in properly managing subordinates, others. Conservative  and Liberal governments administration’s laissez-faire philosophy is also  allowing excessive risk and corruption at the highest echelons and also by too many people with a false disdain for regulation. We need more activist regulatory approaches,  no-nonsense regulators. Too many of these crooks are still governed by a mentality governed by the principle that, “whatever is good for me, I do.”  Behave Honourable or you will be fired, terminated message  needs to be to apply to a range of social, physical, financial, governmental  institutions — and to individuals across right across the board. A real  restoration of a sense of responsibility, personal accountability  and the notions of  advocating beneficial values not just for ourselves, but what’s good for the others, the country as a whole, operating in reality out of a sense of what is being done is for the common good , Our too often poor Regulators do unacceptably “drop the ball,” and have failed to crack down on the bad culture of greed and scheming, to take seriously their own responsibility to “operate honourably.  The CRTC also itself has not put much of a dent in fraud, abuses,  and the entire system needs an overhaul. The CRTC also has missed too many red flags in its oversight of it’s duties, responsibilities..
 
bell-internet-isp
 
Clearly you cannot trust too often crooked Bell or the CRTC .  “Why is Bell allowed to control stuff that isn’t theirs? ” ” However I do have a problem with wholesalers, customers not being able to use the full speed of a network. After all, they pay for the full speed when getting it from the phone companies. They should get the full speed.”  ”  Bell’s known poor acts, actions deserve all kinds of vilification.  What a completely asinine company Bell is. I will never, ever deal with them again. Worst company I’ve ever encountered, what stupid business practices.” ” Bell’s actions too often are still motivated by a desire to undermine competition  and to  increase their customer base seems too often as well to lose more customers.. ” Bell and Rogers caused a lot of the problem themselves, with selling so called “unlimited” packages, only to find new applications use more bandwidth than they had available ot had deployed.  “  “It is not just about the price too,   Bell can be real jerks to its customers. I used to be one until I got sick of their lack of customer service, etc., and even having 2 providers Bell and Rogers/local cable providers essentially in Ontario will NOT decrease prices. Look at the current cell-phone market as an indirect example of how low competition keeps prices high. ” ” and are they Bell and the others going to put unadvertised cap on how much we could download because basically the can to meet their advertised speeds due to their bolster, too often inadequate support structures, equipment too..” Bottom line is that when it comes to telecommunications and especially high speed internet, no one can be trusted, for  the fact is that ISP   – Cable, Telco etc – on their own will not invest in faster networks and bigger coverage areas because of the costs, and the main Corporate desire not to offer a service but a false desire  to make maximum profits with a minimum of capital investment. Services will evolve but at a slower pace until competitors are forced to invest in their own infrastrucuture.

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission on Thursday issued a decision ordering Canada’s big phone companies, including Bell, Telus Corp., MTS Allstream Inc., SaskTel and Bell Aliant, to offer the same internet speeds to smaller wholesale customers as they themselves sell on a retail basis.” Service speed is an important competitive attribute, with rates differing significantly by speed and speed often being a major differentiation point from a marketing standpoint,” the CRTC ruled.

Under existing CRTC regulations, the big phone companies are required to rent out their networks to smaller service providers, who then sell internet access to their own customers. The rules boost the number of competitors selling internet access to the public, and thus keep prices down and service levels up. The regulations, however, have only applied to older infrastructure based in phone companies’ centralized office buildings.

Recently, phone companies have been pushing their networks out of those buildings by putting new equipment into streetside cabinets in an effort to boost their customers’ internet speeds. Smaller internet service providers haven’t had regulated access to those cabinets, however, which means they have been limited to selling slower speeds than those offered by the big phone companies.

In Quebec, for example, Bell has been selling internet connections with download speeds around 16 megabits per second while small ISPs have topped out at less than half that. The phone companies will only be required to offer faster speeds to wholesale ISPs when they sell them on a retail basis in a given area. Smaller ISPs will therefore have to request the faster connections from the phone companies. Bell, Telus and the others have 45 days to file with the CRTC the proposed rates they intend to charge the small ISPs for faster services. The rates will have to represent the actual cost of the service, plus “a reasonable mark-up,” the regulator said.

..the CRTC launched a larger inquiry into how much control large network owners such as Bell, Telus, Rogers Communications Inc. and Shaw Communications Inc., should have over the internet connections they sell to customers.” http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2008/12/12/tech-crtc.html
 
 “The CRTC has had a “cosy” relationship with Bell for as long as I can remember. It is obvious it continues. Short of replacing all the Commissioners with officials elected by net users this will never change. Time for a “revolution” IMO.” ” I really wonder who we have in charge of the CRTC. I would prefer a 13 year old nerd that has the slightest clue about the new hype of the Internet, ”
 
” Net neutrality is one of the most significant “sleeper” issues that will confront the people of Canada over the next decade. Just as we have demanded regulation for our road traffic and public utilities, we will demand fair access to our data services and even to each other. 
 
“Indeed, it is important not to lose sight of how much has changed in the past year. In the fall of 2007, net neutrality was viewed as a fringe issue in Canada without much political traction. In the span of 12 months, there has been a major CRTC case, the Angus bill, a rally on Parliament Hill, a more vocal business community supporting net neutrality and a gradual shift of this issue into the political mainstream. ”  http://www.thestar.com/sciencetech/article/542156  http://www.neutrality.ca/
  
  
 Telecom dinosaurs are like the Big Three auto makers… act now to avoid more future tax funded bailouts.
 
https://thenonconformer.wordpress.com/2008/11/18/deceptive-unacceptable-unfair-business-trade-practices-unreliable-internet-access/ 
 
 
Fair game
 
MONTREAL — The chairman of Bell Canada (TSX:BCE) and three other directors plan to step down from telecom giant’s board early next year, following the collapse of the $52 billion takeover by private equity.

Richard Currie, who was president of Loblaws parent company, George Weston Ltd., is expected to be replaced by Thomas O’Neill at the company’s next shareholders’ meeting in February.

The move was widely expected since the failure of the proposed privatization of Bell Canada by a consortium led by the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan.

Also exiting the board are Judith Maxwell, John McArthur and Robert Pozen.

Currie said serving as BCE chairman during the tumultuous time of change was one of the great honours of his business career.

“The specific measures to create shareholder value announced last Friday make this an opportune time for me to relinquish my board duties,” he stated.

The 71-year-old Currie was elected BCE chairman in April 2002.

O’Neill has served on several committees since joining the board in 2003. The former CEO of PricewaterhouseCoopers is a director of Adecco S.A., the Bank of Nova Scotia (TSX:BNS), Loblaw Companies Ltd. (TSX:L), Nexen Inc. (TSX:NXY), and St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto. 

 
Do continue here  below  to often read about bad Bell.. https://thenonconformer.wordpress.com/tag/bell/
 

do see also

 

July 6, 2008

Bell, BCE, Sympatico. iPhone

Filed under: News and politics — thenonconformer @ 7:14 pm
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Bell bites back with poor-man’s iPhone Globe and Mail – 3 Jul 2008 BCE Inc.’s lengthy struggle to privatize may have left management distracted and Bell Canada’s brand reliant on a couple of aging beavers, but the phone company is still managing to strike back at its more nimble rivals.
Bell to offer smartphone with unlimited data plan CBC.ca
Can You Avoid The iPhone Data Plans From Rogers? Yes, But It Will CTV.ca
E Canada Now – Marketnews.ca – The Gate – Canada NewsWire (press release)

Ever wonder besides viruses that as time goes by you notice that   your computer net is slower, and slower, well it is no secret Bell, Rogers, and others cannot handle the continually increasing demands caused by computers and iphones now too. So their systems break down too often, have too many failures often, are over used, in over capacity mode.. and these carriers seem to  have been to cheap to rectify the problem, update, modernize their communication equipment..    https://thenonconformer.wordpress.com/2009/06/14/buyer-beware-beware/

The stastics on my own sites do show that MY MANY POSTS ABOUT MY UNDENIABLE EXPERIENCE WITH BAD BELL SYMPATICO ARE STILL ON THE TOP 3 MOST POPULAR READINGS OF ALL OF MY VARIOUS TOPICS THAT I HAVE POSTED ON MANY SITES OF MINE.

I had already written months ago  even here that Bell was capping the Sympatico downloads EVEN cause it was making way for their iphone business and Bell will definitely abuse it’s phone customers the next same way it has undeniably now too  abused many of it’s ISP customers. Sad and unaccepatable.
 
    
Message from youth: Don’t charge us for incoming texts
Canoe.ca –  SUN MEDIA A decision by telecom giants Bell and Telus to charge customers for receiving text messages as well as sending them isn’t sitting well with youth who use the service more than any other group.
Bell/Telus Text Messaging Cash Grab Makes No Economic Sense Teleclick.ca
Text-fee plan flayed Winnipeg Sun
Prepaid Reviews – Canada.com – CBC.ca – Canoe.ca
all 109 news articles »
 

 

consumer groups and opposition politicians are alarmed, since cellphone users have no control over who messages them. The groups see the new charges as a cash-grab, and want the federal government to regulate how telecommunications firms set fees. 
 

  

 see also
https://thenonconformer.wordpress.com/2008/04/15/bell-sympatico/
http://postedat.wordpress.com/2008/06/29/dealing-effectively-with-complaints-problems-bad-service-isp-provider/

 http://mywebpage.netscape.com/CtznK287/bell.htm

   

July 5, 2008

Too Many major ISP suppliers are unacceptably guilty of

Filed under: News and politics — thenonconformer @ 5:50 pm
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Too Many major ISP suppliers are unacceptably guilty of initial and subsequent false misleading advertising practices, and an immoral  “Bait and switch” business   practice as well.
 
Here is the undeniable reality.. Many bad ISP corporations beforehand do not disclose the amount of capping that they do to their customers., or after wards, or lie as to much they supposedly cap. For example I have a Bell Sympatico connection or I can use a second party proxy connection, and next I get twice the download speeds with the proxy over the Bell’s capped services even  during the non peak hours as well, such as all day Saturday.. not just  evenings  4.0 pm to 2. am when Bell admits it caps their lines. Now that is a fact any potential bell customer should know now too.
 
“AP  Sun Jun 15, 9:45 AM ET  At one time, the word “unlimited” meant unlimited.
 
Sprint’s mobile broadband service is the latest to abandon the term and the principle in favor of a monthly cap designed to keep their heaviest users from overwhelming their network.
 
But Sprint isn’t alone: its two 3G competitors also cap usage, and two wireline broadband operators are testing explicit caps as well. In the earliest days of broadband, service was either heavily capped, with ridiculously low limits–I recall DSL plans that had 1 GB monthly downstream limits for business-grade offerings–or totally uncapped. 
 
 Now, the idea of capped service with metered rates, stern warnings, or cancellations above a monthly limit are fully in fashion. For the last few years, companies like Comcast and Verizon’s wired broadband division have warned users about excessive downloads, degraded their service, or canceled their accounts, often with little recourse, and sometimes denying it all the while. Enough states’ attorneys general and FCC staff and commissioners have been involved that what was implicit has become explicit, but with the related effect that caps have become much lower than what they were in the ad hoc days before these changes. Driving all this is not scarcity, because there’s plenty of headroom out there on the Internet, but two interrelated issues: service providers always dramatically oversell their service, and some users are actually abusers. ( But really how can one be an absuer when he pays for and uses what was advertised now?
 
 On the first issue, if an ISP has 500 people connected to a central office DSLAM (a DSL aggregator) with a total downstream bandwidth of 2 Gbps, there’s no universe in which a phone company makes available 2 Gbps to that location. Rather, they allot a fraction of that, which works when traffic is bursty, not continuous. Many people downloading or streaming a lot impact everyone in the same grouping. (I’ve seen this at home when I complained about my 3 Mbps DSL dropping to 500 Kbps at night. A Qwest technician explained I was lumped with heavy users, and with about 20 minutes of waiting on the phone, regrouped my line to another, less used pod of users, and my service has been fine since. The nice part is that was a logical change; no one had to walk over to a cage and move my wires around.)
 
The second issue has provoked a lot of debate. But without explicitly labeling the limits on a service, a subscriber can’t technically abuse it. If you know when you sign up for Comcast that they limit your use to 10 GB and provide tools to monitor as well as an understanding of what that bandwidth would allow you to “consume” each month, it’s a very different matter than “all you can eat. “
 
Verizon had long promised unlimited Broadband Access for their 3G EVDO mobile broadband service. But it was well documented that unlimited had fairly strict limits. After an investigation by the New York attorney general’s office, Verizon agreed to change its disclosures, pay some costs to the state, and refund money to some subscribers. The company now fully discloses its 5 GB per month limit for combined upstream and downstream data. Verizon charges you 49 cents per MB ($490 per GB) when you cross that limit, and the company says that they use email, SMS, and a live data usage display in their connection manager to keep you apprised. Note that a single high-definition movie download might consume nearly 5 GB.AT&T, likewise, has a 5 GB cap each month on LaptopConnect, its 3G cell data offering, with unspecified behavior when you top that amount–additional charges may apply, but clarity would be helpful. They note in their PDF-only terms and conditions: “The parties agree that AT&T has the right to impose additional charges if you use more than 5 B in a month. Prior to the imposition of any additional charges, AT&T shall provide you with notice and you shall have the right to terminate your service.”Sprint has joined this club with first the leaked news and then official confirmation that starting July 13, 2008, its 3G service would also have a 5 GB cap. A spokesperson told me that off-network roaming–ostensibly with Verizon or Alltel, the only other major providers of 3G in the US using the EVDO flavor–is capped at 300 MB per month. Now these are all 3G providers, who have limited spectrum over which they have to make sure all contending users in each cell get approximately the same kind of experience. They can’t afford one user sucking down all bandwidth. However, we’re seeing the same kinds of limits start to be tested for cable-based broadband.

Comcast is testing delaying traffic–slowing down packet transmission to throttle the bandwidth rate–in two Eastern cities they cover for the heaviest users of their service. This is an effective cap, rather than a cutoff. (Comcast has been delaying BitTorrent P2P traffic for all its users prior to this; this change affects all traffic, not just BitTorrent, and is being announced, instead of sub rosa.) In a town in Texas, Time Warner Cable is experimenting with offering different speed packages each of which is coupled with a monthly limit on usage. The lowest-priced package offers a ridiculous 768 Kbps downstream and 1 GB per month for $30 per month; the highest-priced is 15 Mbps downstream with a more reasonable 40 GB per month limit. Charges are $1 per GB above that. With cable companies traditionally and telephone companies newly offering television programming, premium channels, and on-demand video, the caps are another tool to prevent competition from over-the-Internet sources of things to watch. In a situation in which a few carriers control all the pieces, it’s unclear whether rate caps can stick. If both telcos and cable companies decide to impose such limits and restructure their networks, who do you turn to? People with broadband are unlikely to cancel it. In a monopoly or duopoly market, you can’t switch brands. There has to be a happy middle–a role that the FCC may help to negotiate. A 40 GB cap switched to 400 GB might serve precisely the right purpose without penalizing average users who have no other market choice. With Time Warner Cable charging a buck a gigabyte above their monthly limits in their test market, but with Amazon’s S3 service delivering it retail for as little as a tenth that, it’s not hard to see that carriers are looking to caps to solve network problems and make a little scratch on the side.”  http://news.yahoo.com/s/pcworld/20080615/tc_pcworld/146752

 http://mywebpage.netscape.com/CtznK287/bell.htm
 
Beware always of men and women, bullies, tormentors, control freaks,  persons, civil and public servants,  politicians, pastors, leaders, elders, Corporations, governments who falsely do, will try to enslave you, oppress you, exploit you even while they claim they are proclaiming the truth, democracy, trying to help you, etc.,
 
Is 51:23 ..your tormentors {and} oppressors, those who said to you, Bow down, that we may ride {or} tread over you; and you have made your back like the ground and like the street for them to pass over.

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