The non conformer's Canadian Weblog

February 9, 2009

fresh, healthy food too expensive: Poll

1canada1  
TORONTO — Almost half of Canadians say they are going without fresh, healthy food because it is too expensive, according to a national poll released Monday by the Heart and Stroke Foundation.
http://www.calgaryherald.com/Health/Canadians+fresh+healthy+food+expensive+Poll/1269731/story.html

The poll showed 47 per cent of Canadians don’t buy fresh fruit, vegetables, dairy and whole grain products, lean meat or fish because of the cost.

The foundation’s annual report on Canadians’ Health also revealed what it called “startling discrepancies” in the cost and availability of basic healthy food from province to province.

“Depending on where you live, some Canadians are often paying more than double to almost six times the price for the same basic healthy food,” the report said.

The foundation said governments need to “create a level playing field” for consumers.

“Many provincial governments regulate the price of alcohol across provinces, but healthy food is subject to significant price variations from one community to the next,” said foundation spokesman Stephen Samis.

“You have to wonder why we control the price of alcohol but allow such price inconsistencies for healthy food — and not just in remote regions of the country — but even between larger metropolitan areas.”

For example, the poll found the cost of six apples ranged from $1.71 in Edmonton to $5.02 in Calgary. In Ontario, where apples are grown regionally, the cost varied from 90 cents in Peterborough to $5.49 in Dryden. A 2.7 kg bag of potatoes ranged from $1.50 in Toronto to $2.15 in Whitehorse, to $6.95 in Yellowknife, N.W.T.

The Heart and Stroke Foundation said the wide variation in the cost of healthy food is even more disturbing when compared to the relatively stable price of pop, chips and cookies.

“Healthy eating is a key factor in preventing heart disease,” cardiologist Dr. Beth Abramson, said Monday. “This report should serve as a wake-up call that healthy eating is in danger of being out of reach for many Canadians, a problem which may only get worse given the current downturn in the economy.”

Last October, the Heart and Stroke Foundation had volunteer shoppers in 66 communities across Canada purchase a list of healthy foods for a family of four for one week.

It found some of the most “disturbing” data was reflected in the price variations of grain products. For example, a package of whole-wheat pasta that cost $2 in Barrie, Ont., was $7.90 in Regina, Sask., and $11.37 in Dawson City, Yukon. A bag of brown rice ranged from $2.19 in Toronto to $7.76 in Winnipeg, to $11.99 in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut.

In the case of both milk and cheese, the survey found prices could be more than double depending on where you live.

A pound of lean ground beef could range from $13.21 in Ottawa to $4.99 in Peterborough, Ont. and the Yukon.

The foundation said these price variations may explain why almost half of adults and 70 per cent children in Canada don’t consume the minimum recommended servings of vegetables and fruit established by Canada’s Food Guide.

“This can only encourage unhealthy eating behaviour that will ultimately lead to obesity and risk factors for heart disease,” Abramson said.

 The situation was found to be even worse for First Nations people and Inuit, many of whom live in isolated communities.

In northern Ontario, four litres of milk was $15.70 in Bearskin Lake, compared to $3.49 in Vancouver. A package of whole-wheat pasta was $8.68, compared to $2.00 in Barrie, Ont. Other high cost items included: $10.99 for six oranges; $7.45 for six apples; and $10.88 for a 2.7 kg. bag of carrots. Survey shoppers also found that many healthy foods including chicken legs, frozen fish, fresh tomatoes, fresh broccoli, canned corn, canned peas, frozen mixed vegetables, potatoes and brown rice weren’t available at all in Bearskin Lake.

The study also found that healthy foods such as dried beans and frozen spinach were unavailable in almost one in three grocery stores where the foundation shopped.

The only items that showed little price variation and accessibility from one community to the next were pop, chips and cookies, which Canada’s Food Guide recommends be consumed less frequently.

Now on top of all that add to that how food manufacturers, drug stores do also make big  profits on health related items

-**

FBI joins investigation  while the RCMP is too busy consuming alcohol?

 
Now we all know that prices can vary, even significantly from one  retail store to another, and that price fixings also do exist something the consumer affairs ministers need to supervise with more vigilance than they tend to do so as well now..  DO FORWARD THEM THIS NOTE, REMINDER NOW TOO.
 
Still Shopping in one sole store is a dangerous way to try to save on essential good and health costs, but what do you do when there is not much choice, you are at the mercy of the seller, distributor, who often wrongfully do not hesitate to take advantage of it and to price gouge you. Simple old fashion greed is the basis of the high prices everywhere it seems. Take  for instance 1 in 8 persons is diabetic, but yet   the price of sugar free products is often 300 percent higher or even much more for a start.. the same applies to Margarine, etc
 
NOTE  THE fresh, healthy food IS EXPENSIVE FIRSTLY CAUSE THE RETAILERS HAVE A HIGH PRICE MARK UP ON IT. NOW THAT INCLUDES NOT ONLY FRUITS, AND VEGETABLES but other supposedly more healthier products.. YES THE SHIPPING COSTS FROM CALIFORNIA HAVE SOMETHING TO DO WITH IT, BUT CALIFORNIA IS IN DRASTIC RECESSION SO YOU WOULD THINK THE PRICES THERE OF THEIR GOODS WOULD BE CHEAPER NOW AS WELL? The old excuse of the price of high rising cost of fuel is no longer valid as well.
 
 
Toronto Medical Officer calls for $100 food supplement in  The Canadian Press – TORONTO – A Toronto woman says an extra $100 a month in social assistance would be the difference between eating nutritious food and eating whatever is on sale.
Medical community urges health food supplement CTV.ca
HEALTH: Campaign aims to ‘put food in the budget’ Inside Toronto
CityNews
 

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: